FORM 13F: FILINGS DUE AUGUST 15

 

The August 15 deadline for investment advisers to make Form 13F filings to report equity security securities holdings of their managed accounts is approaching.  Form 13F must be filed within 45 days of the end of a calendar quarter.

As required by Section 13(f) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and rule 13f-1, Institutional investment managers ( which includes investment advisers)  must file Form 13F with the SEC if they exercise investment discretion for accounts holding Section 13(f) securities.  Section 13(f) securities are defined in the rules as securities having an aggregate fair market vaule of at least $100 million on the last trading day of any month of any calendar year. 

What types of securities are Section 13F securities? The SEC has said that “[s]ection 13(f) securities generally include equity securities that trade on an exchange (including the Nasdaq National Market System), certain equity options and warrants, shares of closed-end investment companies, and certain convertible debt securities.  The shares of open-end investment companies (i.e., mutual funds) are not Section 13(f) securities.”  Advisers can find Section 13(f) securities on the Official List of Section 13(f) Securities.  An updated list of 13(f) securities is published on a quarterly basis.

Advisers can also find valuable information about the filing’s requirements in the Frequently Asked Questions About Form 13F.   

SEC ANNOUNCES REGIONAL COMPLIANCE OUTREACH SEMINARS

The SEC has announced its schedule for the  upcoming Compliance Outreach Program regional seminars to be held in Chicago, New York, Atlanta and San Francisco.   Investment adviser and investment company senior officers, including chief compliance officers (CCOs) are invited to register and attend.  The first meeting will occur in Chicago on August 28. 

 This years’ Compliance Outreach Program, which started off  in Boston in May, will likely include panel discussions with SEC staff from the Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations (OCIE), Division of Investment Management, and Division of Enforcement’s Asset Management Unit.  Topics will vary depending on location. For example, the Chicago seminar will address traded and non-traded real estate investment trusts, investment companies with special emphasis on alternative investment funds and money market funds, and current enforcement actions in the investment management industry.  The New York seminar will focus more on newly registered investment advisers, dual registrants and to investment advisers affiliated broker-dealers, and will topics like the SEC’s examination process, priorities, risk surveillance, and examination selection process.   

 As we’ve alerted our audience in previous blogs, investment advisers should attend these meetings because “[t]he seminars highlight areas of focus for compliance professionals.  They provide an opportunity for the SEC staff to identify common issues found in related examinations or investigations and discuss industry practices, including how compliance professionals have addressed such matters.”

Registration information about the regional seminars is available at:

http://www.sec.gov/News/PressRelease/Detail/PressRelease/1370539720572#.Uef5kdK1Eec

 

Time For Quarterly Transaction Reports

FE_DA_Deadline_050613425x283A reminder to advisers,  the code of ethics you adopted probably requires quarterly reports to be prepared for all personal securities transactions made by access persons.  If it doesn’t there are two possible reasons (1) chances are you haven’t read it, or (2) you don’t have one — in which case you need to first read Rule 204A-1 of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940.

The Timing of Transaction Reports

Under Rule 204A-1(b)(2), these reports are due no later than 30 days after the close of the calendar quarter.   Access persons who would be submitting duplicate information contained in trade confirmations or account statements that an  adviser holds in its records (provided the adviser has received those confirmations or statements not later than 30 days after the close of the calendar quarter in which the transaction takes place) may be excused by their investment advisers from submitting transaction reports.

Who is an access person?

Rule 204A-1(e)(1) defines an access person as a supervised person who has access to nonpublic information regarding clients’ purchase or sale of securities, is involved in making securities recommendations to clients or who has access to such recommendations that are nonpublic.  Further, a supervised person who has access to nonpublic information regarding the portfolio holdings of affiliated mutual funds is also an access person, but only to the extent they make, participate in, or obtain information regarding, the purchase and sale of the fund’s securities, or if their functions relate to the making of any recommendations for such transactions.

This definition is broad enough to include, for example,

(i) portfolio management personnel and, in some organizations, client service representatives who communicate investment advice to clients;

(ii)  administrative, technical, and clerical personnel if their functions or duties give them access to nonpublic information;

(iii) organizations where  employees may have broad responsibilities, and fewer information barriers are in place  to prevent access to nonpublic information.  On the other hand, as the SEC has noted, organizations that keep strict controls on sensitive information may have fewer access persons; and

(iv) presumably if the firm’s primary business is providing investment advice, then all of its directors, officers and partners would be access persons.

When must access persons report personal securities transactions?

Under Rule 204A-1(b), each of an adviser’s access persons must report his securities holdings at the time that the person becomes an access person and at least once annually thereafter. Further, they must make to the adviser’s Chief Compliance Officer or other designated person a report at least once quarterly of all personal securities transactions in reportable securities.

What are “reportable securities”?

Rule 204A-1 treats all securities as reportable securities, but list five exceptions designed to exclude securities that appear to present little opportunity for the type of improper trading that the access person reports are designed to uncover. These include transactions and holdings in:

  • direct obligations of the Government of the United States.
  • money market instruments — bankers’ acceptances, bank certificates of deposit, commercial paper, repurchase agreements and other high quality short-term debt instruments.
  • shares of money market funds.
  • shares of other types of mutual funds, unless the adviser or a control affiliate acts as the investment adviser or principal underwriter for the fund.
  • units of a unit investment trust if the unit investment trust is invested exclusively in unaffiliated mutual funds.

There are other exceptions. For example, under Rule 204A-1, no reports are required for transactions effected under an automatic investment plan; No reports are required for securities held in accounts over which the access person has no direct or indirect influence or control; and finally, under Rule 204A-1(d), no report is required in the case of an advisory firm that has only one access person, so long as the firm maintains records of the holdings and transactions that rule 204A-1 would otherwise require be reported.

There are other requirements in Rule 204A-1, the Code of Ethics Rule, covering access persons transactions and holdings that advisers should review.  These includes such issues as pre-approval of certain investments, review of personal holdings and transaction reports, procedures to address personal trading and reporting of violations.

 

 

A Lesson From Ameriprise: Risk Mitigation With Third-Party Prospectus Delivery

Broker-dealers and other financial service firms using third-party service vendors, whether to reduce costs, enhance performance, and obtain access to specific expertise, and perform vital functions, sounds good in most instances.  But doing so is not without risks.

FINRA’s recent disciplinary action against Ameriprise, tagging it with a censure and fine of $525,000, is a reminder of inherent risks when firms fail to monitor outsourced service work to third parties.  In settling with Ameriprise (through an Acceptance Waiver and Consent, FINRA Case # 2011029100301) FINRA found that Ameriprise, in approximately 580,000 transactions, failed to timely deliver mutual fund prospectuses to its customers within three business days of their purchases.  FINRA also found Ameriprise to have failed to establish and maintain adequate supervisory systems and written supervisory procedures that should have reasonably monitored and ensured the timely delivery of mutual fund prospectuses — a requirement of Section 5(b)(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

As FINRA noted, Rule 10b-10, promulgated under Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, requires a broker-dealer to provide to the customer, in writing, certain information “at or before completion of such transaction” and that transactions are complete when they settle.  Rule 15c6-l(a) provides that securities transactions settle in three business days, unless otherwise specified.  Consequently, a broker-dealer must deliver a prospectus to a customer who has purchased a mutual fund no later than three business days after the transaction.

What are the compliance takeaways from the Ameriprise action?  How does a firm avoid or mitigate legal, reputational and operational risks to its business when dealing with outside vendors?

First, firms should make sure they hire qualified vendors and that such relationship are structured to avoid operational problems. Expectations on both sides need to be clearly articulated.  Second,  monitor frequently and document that the outsourced activity is being properly managed.*  Appropriate oversight ensures that the third-party program is meeting its regulatory purpose.  Third, document and make sure that the third-party has adequate internal controls.  Finally, make sure that the vendor has a contingency plan in the event of a disruption, and make sure that you do the same.

In the end, while day-to-day management of a service like sending the prospectus can, in some instances, be transferred to a third party, ultimate responsibility for any compliance requirement cannot be delegated and remains with the financial service firm.

*Outsourcing Financial Services Activities: Industry Practices to Mitigate Risks, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, October 1999, p. 5, available online.; Outsourcing By Financial Services Firms, Broker-Dealer Regulation (Second Edition) Practicing Law Institute, C.E. Kirsch.