NEW REGISTRATION RULES FOR MUNICIPAL ADVISORS

As they were required to do under the Dodd-Frank Act, the SEC announced that it has now voted to adopt permanent rules requiring municipal advisors to register.  Previously, and immediately after Dodd-Frank,  municipal advisors were placed under a temporary registration requirement, and following it, more than 1,100 municipal advisors registered with the SEC.

The permanent rule, the SEC says, will address the long concern about the fallout from losses suffered, in part, by municipalities purchasing complex derivatives products and relying on the advice from unregulated advisors — advisors, who municipalities may not have been aware, may have had conflicts of interest.   In addition to defining the term “municipal advisor,” and who is exempted from that definition, the rule  identifies when a person is considered to be providing “advice.”   For example, the SEC says, other than general giving information, a  person recommending to a municipal entity advice based on a particular need related to municipal financial products or related to the muncipalities’ issuance of municipal securities would be considered providing muncipal advice. 

The SEC’s Press Release states that the new rules will be effective 60 days after publication in the Federal Register.

THE UPWARD TREND IN MUNCIPAL SECURITIES CASE ENFORCEMENT

upwards-trendThe past two weeks has seen the SEC’s continued ratchet upward the number of enforcement actions against municipal securities participants for disclosure violations.

These enforcement actions also continue to ensnare an array of players in municipal securities transactions, that include underlying obligors, their chief executive officers, national and regional investment banks, the heads of public finance departments at several investment banks, as well as individual investment bankers at various levels of seniority, issuers, issuer officials, financial advisers, attorneys and accountants.

The cases have involved everything from  tax or arbitration-driven fraud, pay-to-play and public corruption violations, public pension accounting and disclosure fraud, valuation/pricing issues, and most recently, more offering offering and disclosure fraud, involving misleading statements or omissions in offerings.

Two recent enforcement actions illustrate this trend.  The first, SEC v. City of Miami, Florida and Michael Boudreaux, an SEC complaint filed in federal court in Miami alleged that the City of Miami, through its then Budget Director, charged that beginning in 2008, the City and the budget director made materially false and misleading statements and omissions concerning certain interfund transfers in three 2009 bond offerings totaling $153.5 million, as well as in the City’s fiscal year 2007 and 2008 Comprehensive Annual Financial Reports.  The City puportedly transferred a total of approximately $37.5 million from its Capital Improvement Fund and a Special Revenue Fund to the General Fund in 2007 and 2008 in order to mask increasing deficits in the General Fund.

The complaint alleged that the City and the budget director failed to disclose to bondholders that the transferred funds included legally restricted dollars which, under Miami’s city code, was not permitted to be commingled with any other funds or revenues of the City.  The defendants  also failed to disclose that the funds transferred were allocated to specific capital projects which still needed those funds as of the fiscal year end or, in some instances, already spent that money.  The transfers enabled the City of Miami to meet or come close to meeting its own requirements relating to General Fund reserve levels.  According to the SEC, the results of the transfers, meant that the City’s bond offerings were all rated favorably by credit rating agencies.

The second and most recent case, In The Matter of  West Clark Community Schools, a settled administrative cease-and desist proceeding, involved the West Clark Community Schools, an Indiana school district.  In 2005, the West Clark Community Schools contractually, in accordance with SEC rules, undertook to annually disclose certain financial information, operating data and event notices in connection with a $52 million municipal bond offering.  In 2007, the school district, in connection with a $31 million municipal bond offering, stated in public bond offering documents that it had not failed, in the previous five years, to comply in all material respects with any prior disclosure undertakings. That statement, the SEC alleged, as well as a Certificate and Affidavit signed by the School District attesting that the offering documents did not contain any untrue statement of material fact, was materially false.  To the contrary, the SEC found that between at least 2005 and 2010 the School District never submitted any of its contractually required disclosures.

As a result, the SEC claimed that the school district violated Section 17(a)(2) of the Securities Act and Section 10(b) of the Exchange Act and Rule 10b-5(b) thereunder.  In a separate, but related, settled cease-and-desist proceeding, In the Matter of City Securities Corporation and Randy G. Ruhl, the SEC found that City Securities, the underwiter, and an vice president of City Securities’ municipal bond department conducted inadequate due diligence and, as a result, failed to form a reasonable basis for believing the truthfulness of material statements in an the school district’s  official statement, resulting in City Securities offering and selling municipal securities on the basis of a materially misleading disclosure document.

In addition to being censured, City Securities was ordered to pay disgorgement and civil penalties.  The vice president was barred from the securities industry with a right to reapply after one year and ordered to pay disgorgement and civil penalties.

In July 2012, the SEC  issued a comprehensive report with recommendations aimed at helping improve the structure and enhance disclosure provided to investors for a municipal securities market that has grown to $3.7 trillion in municipal debt outstanding from a level of $361 Billion in 1981.  To that, add potential enforcement actions from the MSRB, states, and other SROs, and there’s little doubt that the enforcement action trend will escalate.